Friday, March 27, 2020

Poetry Sisters Write Classics

The challenge this month was to write a poem in any form with the theme of classic, or to an image we consider classic.

Life is so hard right now that it was difficult not to focus on the state of the world as I began to write. I  tried to brainstorm some ideas and asked myself, "What is classic?" I immediately thought of the classic cars my father loved and repaired, the "classics" an English major reads, the classics major, and the way my son says "classic" when he listens to his friends talk about their escapades. That short list set me on a familiar path. You see, I've written a lot of poems about my dad since his death, now almost 11 years ago. I'm not sure why, but my heart and poems often seem to find their way to him.  Here's what I came up with.

My Father's Hobby
Worn out shells of classic cars
rusty and forlorn
peaking out from weeds and grass
"Parts cars"
my father called them
culled them for the Fiat
he was rebuilding in the garage
"Junk!"
my mother called them

On Sunday drives we traveled
with the classifieds
stopping to check out
cars for sale
sometimes adding another to the
growing collection of clunkers
each sacrificing a bit of its guts
a carburetor here, a steering wheel there
a stick shift, a parking brake

I often sat quietly on a stool
watching him work
in rain, in cold
hour after hour
his labor of love
in pieces more than whole

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2020. All rights reserved.

You can read the poems written by my poetry sisters at the links below.
Tanita Davis
Rebecca Holmes
Sara Lewis Holmes
Kelly Ramsdell
Laura Purdie Salas
Liz Garton Scanlon
Andi Sibley

I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Tabatha Yeatts at The Opposite of Indifference. Happy poetry Friday friends!

Friday, February 28, 2020

Poetry Sisters Look Back - Take 1

In setting our challenges for this year, we decided that we would take time to revisit poems we wrote in previous outings. I  spent way too much  time looking back through old  posts! Seriously,  this monthly  adventure has  generated a lot of writing. I finally settled on our September 2015 challenge  in which we wrote found poems. I experimented with blackout poems and shared a few I strung together to into a story of sorts. When I looked back through my poetry notebook, I found an unfinished and abandoned poem from this prompt and decided it would be my focus for this month. The first thing I  did was change it from a blackout poem to "white out" poem.  This seems a bit easier on the eyes to me. I also played around a bit with the words I chose to include, changing the theme of the poem.

I found this interesting because my original  post  included a poem created from a recipe by Jamie Oliver. This "lost" poem was created from the August 29, 2002 blog entry from The Julie/Julia Project.

Here's my updated poem. You'll probably need to click on the image to see/read it.

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2020. All rights reserved.

You can read the poems written by my poetry sisters at the links below.
Tanita Davis
Rebecca Holmes
Sara Lewis Holmes
Kelly Ramsdell
Laura Purdie Salas
Liz Garton Scanlon
Andi Sibley


I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Karen Edmisten. Happy poetry Friday friends!

Friday, January 31, 2020

Poetry Sisters and the LAST Friday of the Month - January Haiku

It seems late to be saying happy new year, but welcome 2020. This year my poetry sisters and I will be sharing our challenges on the LAST Friday of the month instead of the first. I'm grateful for the little bit of added time.

This month the challenge was to write a haiku with the theme or foresight, or the new year, or both. I'll admit I normally write every day, but I haven't written anything in a few weeks. It felt good to sit down and put pen to paper. Yes, that is how I write poetry!

Honestly, I would prefer to wrestle with a sonnet than a haiku. Some folks make haiku look easy, but man, getting it right is hard. Here are a few of the poems I wrote.


New Year's morning
recalling the prior year
fills me with gratitude



Janus minds the door
ushers in another year
humbles us with hindsight




January first
the birds in the trees sing
just another day


this year of foresight
cancel my psychic readings
horoscopes be damned


another new year
calendars out of sync
school's not even half over

Poems ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2020. All rights reserved.

You can read the poems written by my poetry sisters at the links below.
Tanita Davis
Rebecca Holmes
Sara Lewis Holmes
Kelly Ramsdell
Laura Purdie Salas
Liz Garton Scanlon
Andi Sibley

I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Jone MscCulloch at Deowriter. Happy poetry Friday friends!

Friday, December 06, 2019

Poetry Sisters Write With/In Gratitude

In this final month of the year, our challenge was to write a poem of gratitude in any form. I've been pondering favorite lines  of poetry  and  using them to write my own  poems, so today I'm sharing  a golden  shovel that uses a line from "The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock" by T.S. Eliot.

A Golden Shovel for My Poetry Sisters

This is beyond me, myself, and I.
We are friends who have
been tested and measured 
by all that life can throw at us. Out 
of affection and gratitude for my 
sisters, I declare that this life 
would not be the same with-
out you. I am the tea to your coffee,
you are the forks to my spoons.

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2019. All rights reserved.

You can read the poems written by my poetry sisters at the links below.
Tanita Davis
Sara Lewis Holmes
Rebecca Holmes
Kelly Ramsdell
Laura Purdie Salas
Liz Garton Scanlon
Andi Sibley

I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Tanita Davis at fiction, instead of lies. Happy poetry Friday friends!

Friday, November 01, 2019

Poetry Sisters Write Villanelles

This month Tanita set the challenge to write a villanelle on a wintry topic. We had the added requirement of including a pair of words (or homonyms thereof) from the following eleven: bleak, draft, gutter, chill, chime, glitter, gust, harsh, rime, nip, thaw.

The villanelle is a nineteen-line poem with two repeating rhymes and two refrains. It is made up of five tercets and a quatrain. The rhyme scheme is aba aba aba aba aba abaa. The 1st and 3rd lines from the first stanza are alternately repeated so that the 1st line becomes the last line in the second stanza, and the 3rd line becomes the last line in the third stanza and so on. The last two lines of the poem are lines 1 and 3 respectively.

As much as I love winter, I tend to get the blues from December through  February. I started thinking about the coming season, the snow projections (more than usual for VA), the prospect of indoor recess, the early placement of Christmas items (before Halloween!), and a number of other ideas. Once I started writing, I realized I'd chosen an odd end word for the "a" rhyme, which made choosing words a bit challenging, but the poem finally came together. Here's what I came up  with.

December's Discontent

December’s onset brings a discontent
a case of blues that lingers into spring
when winter’s snow and chill will not relent

Short days a coda to the heart’s lament
it’s fall’s crisp days to which we madly cling
when December brings a discontent

As autumn turns to winter we resent
the doldrums of the months that clip our wings
when winter’s snow and chill will not relent

The house is bleak, the family in dissent
for cabin fever leads to arguing
December’s onset brings a discontent

Time outdoors brings nothing but torment
as ice and wind assault the cheeks and sting
when winter’s snow and chill will not relent

But we'll hunker by the fire, breathe in its scent
and dream of early thaw and blossoms crowning
December’s onset brings a discontent
when winter’s snow and chill will not relent

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2019. All rights reserved.

You can read the poems written by my poetry sisters at the links below. Kelly and Andi are both on  the mend, so we'll welcome their  return  when  they're both feeling better.
I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by  Tabatha  Yeatts at The  Opposite of Indifference. Happy poetry Friday friends!

Friday, October 04, 2019

Poetry Sisters Write Pastoral Poems

Rebecca set this month's challenge to write a poem in the pastoral mode. We could choose the form and topic, so this one was wide open. Rebecca shared an excerpt from one of my "go to" books on form, The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms. I also found Poetry 101: What Is a Pastoral Poem? to be particularly helpful. Here is an excerpt:
What is the Purpose of a Pastoral Poem? 
An overriding, defining theme of pastoral poems is the idea of an idealized vision of country life, in which humans live simply and in harmony with nature. Other common themes and motifs that characterize the pastoral mode include:
  • A beautiful, natural setting
  • Shepherds as central characters (who are often used as vehicles for political or religious allegory)
  • Religious allegory in pastoral poetry is aided by the common association between Christianity and shepherds/flocks of sheep
  • The trope of a return to an idealized Golden Age, when humans lived in complete harmony with nature
  • Focus on imagined life in the country, rather than reality
  • The working belief that country life is superior to urban life
It was hard to live up to some of these motifs, but I gave it a shot. I have been scribbling random lines of poetry all over my field notes this week. I'm not sure I have a finished poem, but the idea here is to be brave and share our drafts. Here's mine.

On Retirement In a Tiny House 

In dreams I Marie Kondo my life
pack what remains into a tiny house
built from reclaimed barn wood
and church windows
(indoor plumbing be damned)

I put down roots in my very own Walden
find solitude in a wildflower meadow
just beside a copse of trees
or shallow, vernal pool
a bucolic spot to loiter through the seasons
my only neighbors the birds and wild creatures

No television, phone, or radio to distract
from the serenading of the hooting owl,
chirping cricket, chittering squirrel

I've all the time in the world
to tend a garden
read books
write poems
walk and wander and wonder
grateful and thrilled to be alive

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2019. All rights reserved.

You can read the pieces written by my Poetry Sisters at the links below. 
I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected at Library Matters. Happy poetry Friday friends!

Sunday, September 08, 2019

Poetry Sisters Get Herpetological

Laura set this month's challenge to write a "poem comparing something with a snake — some snake pairing you think has never been done before! 8 lines or less."

Hmmmmm ... my brain has been on overload since I started my sabbatical in earnest 3 weeks ago. I'm going to blame it for my inability to follow the rules in any meaningful way. I did however come up with something that is a close tangent.

What a Herpetologist Sees

That lamp cord, that shoelace,
that bathrobe waist tie,
some pasta just rolled up
jet trails in the sky
Anguiform, serpentine
shapes all around
each place that I look
snakes simply abound

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2019. All rights reserved.

You can read the pieces written by my Poetry Sisters at the links below. Kelly will be back with us next time.
I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected by Sylvia Vardell at Poetry for Children. Happy poetry Friday friends!