Sunday, April 18, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 18

Today's poem comes from The Street Beneath My Feet, written by Charlotte Guillain and illustrated by Yuval Zommer.

Beneath My Feet

walking the city streets
stop and look down
what's deep in the ground
under your feet?

  pipes, wires, and cables
  earthworms loosening soil
  centipedes and microorganisms
  the sewer where wastewater goes
  rats!
  history, objects left behind
  coins, pottery, swords
  skeletons
  loud rumbling noise - train!
  passengers, stations, tunnels
  limestone cave 
  stalactites and stalagmites
  underground river
  rock plates
  partly melted rock 
  liquid iron and nickel
  solid iron crystals
     at the center
     the hottest place on the planet

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California
April 9 - Night on the Reef
April 12 - Slow Thoughts
April 13 - Snowflake Bentley 
April 16 - One Well
April 17 - Phytoplankton

Saturday, April 17, 2021

Onward with the Progressive Poem

I can't believe we're more than halfway through National Poetry Month. It's been a while since I've participated in this endeavor, so I'm glad to be back as a participant in the progressive poem. I am following in the footsteps of many talented poets and have loved following along so far.

Heidi Mordhorst of my juicy little universe gave me these two lines to choose from:

With acorns and moss could we fashion a critter?
OR
Let's find pine needles, turn into vine knitters!

Why did she have to make it so hard?! Read on to see which one I chose!

I’m a case of kindness – come and catch me if you can!
Easily contagious – sharing smiles is my plan.
I’ll spread my joy both far and wide,
As a force of Nature I’ll be undenied.

Words like, “how can I help?” will bloom in the street.
A new girl alone on the playground – let’s meet, let’s meet!
We can jump-skip together in a double-dutch round.
Over, under, jump and wonder, touch the ground.

Friends can be found when you open a door.
Side by side, let’s walk through, there’s a world to explore.
We’ll hike through a forest of towering trees
Find a stream we can follow while we bask in the breeze.

Pull off our shoes and socks, dip our toes in the icy spring water
When you’re with friends, there’s no have to or oughter
What could we make, with leaves and litter?
Let's find pine needles, turn into vine knitters!

I'm a nature girl at heart, so choosing where to go next left so many possibilities. Here are the lines I came up with ...

We'll be swingers of birches and climbers of trees
OR
We'll lie on our backs and find shapes in the sky

I'm happily handing this off to Linda Baie at Teacher Dance and can't wait to see which one she'll choose and where she will take us on this collaborative adventure.

*****
Here's where the poem has been and where it's going!

April 1 Kat Apel at Kat Whiskers
2 Linda Mitchell at A Word Edgewise
3 Mary Lee at A Year of Reading
4 Donna Smith at Mainly Write
5 Irene Latham at Live your Poem
6 Jan Godown Annino at BookseedStudio
7 Rose Cappelli at Imagine the Possibilities
8 Denise Krebs at Dare to Care
9 Margaret Simon at Reflections on the Teche
10 Molly Hogan at Nix the Comfort Zone
11 Buffy Silverman
12 Janet Fagel at Reflections on the Teche
13 Jone Rush MacCulloch
14 Susan Bruck at Soul Blossom Living
15 Wendy Taleo at Tales in eLearning
16 Heidi Mordhorst at my juicy little universe
17 Tricia Stohr-Hunt at The Miss Rumphius Effect
18 Linda Baie at Teacher Dance
19 Carol Varsalona at Beyond Literacy Link
20 Robyn Hood Black at Life on the Deckle Edge
21 Leigh Anne Eck at A Day in the Life
22 Ruth Hersey at There is No Such Thing as a God-forsaken Town
23 Janice Scully at Salt City Verse
24 Tabatha Yeatts at The Opposite of Indifference
25 Shari Daniels at Islands of my Soul
26 Tim Gels at Yet There is Method
27 Rebecca Newman
28 Catherine Flynn at Reading to the Core
29 Christie Wyman at Wondering and Wondering
30 Michelle Kogan at More Art 4 All

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 17

Today's poem comes from Ocean Sunlight: How Tiny Plants Feed the Seas, written by Molly Bang and Penny Chisholm and illustrated by Molly Bang. 

Phytoplankton

blue water
green plants
everywhere
countless shapes
and sizes
so small
tiny plants
drifting
invisible pasture
feeds all life
in the sea 

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California
April 9 - Night on the Reef
April 12 - Slow Thoughts
April 13 - Snowflake Bentley 
April 16 - One Well

Friday, April 16, 2021

Poetry Friday and NPM 2021 - Found Poem 16

Welcome Poetry Friday friends! This year for National Poetry Month I'm writing and sharing found poems, most of which are science- or nature-themed. You can learn more about this form and my plans in this post describing the project. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 

Today's poem comes from pages 4, 8, 26, and 28 of One Well: The Story of Water on Earth, written by Rochelle Strauss and illustrated by Rosemary Woods. 

One Well

all water on Earth
is connected
the water you drink today 
may have
 rained down on the Amazon
  been steam escaping a teapot 
   flowed in an underground river

water has the power to
 sprout a seed
  quench a thirst
   provide a habitat
    generate energy

every splash
means life

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California
April 9 - Night on the Reef
April 12 - Slow Thoughts
April 13 - Snowflake Bentley 

I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Jama Rattigan at Jama's Alphabet Soup. Happy Poetry Friday all!

Thursday, April 15, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 15

Today's found poem comes from How Ben Franklin Stole the Lightning, written and illustrated by Rosalyn Schanzer.

Ben Franklin, Inventor

thunderstorms brewing
ring church bells for all they're worth
steal lightning from the sky

pure electricity
a kite string, key, silk ribbon
famous lightning ro

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California
April 9 - Night on the Reef
April 12 - Slow Thoughts
April 13 - Snowflake Bentley 

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 14

Today's poem comes from Strange Creatures: The Story of Walter Rothschild and His Museum, written and illustrated by Lita Judge.

Walter Rothschild and His Museum

unusual boy
spent time collecting
bugs, birds, animals
loved every creature 
dreamed a museum

hired explorers to  
collect specimens from
the far corners 
of the globe
new discoveries! 
beautiful and strange creatures!

crowds lined up to see
the zoological collection 
that forever changed 
our understanding
of the world's creatures

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California
April 9 - Night on the Reef
April 12 - Slow Thoughts

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 13

Today's poem comes from Snowflake Bentley, written by Jacqueline Briggs Martin and illustrated by Mary Azarian.

Snowflake Bentley

a boy loved snow
more than anything
found intricate patterns
more beautiful than imagined

to share what he had seen
learned to cut away 
 dark parts of the negative
waited hours for the right crystal
never found two alike

universal hexagonal shape
infinite designs

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California
April 9 - Night on the Reef
April 12 - Slow Thoughts

Monday, April 12, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 12

Today's poem comes from p. 8, 12, 14, 16, 30, 41, 50, 144, 161, 163, and 168 of The Slowest Book Ever, written by April Pullley Sayre and illustrated by Kelly Murphy.


Slow Thoughts

count to one thousand
 ponder a lifetime
  imagine transforming
   experience time in slow motion

the entire world can be amazing
 open fields
  feathers
   the sky
    a handful of soil
     animals on Earth
      millions of people

the universe is a great mystery
 impossibly big
don't worry 
if you do not understand
that we are seeing the past
when we see the light of stars

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California
April 9 - Night on the Reef

Sunday, April 11, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 11

Today's poem comes from p. 24-25 of The Dirt on Dirt, written by Paulette Bourgeois and illustrated by Martha Newbigging.


Archaeologists Look for Clues

mounds of dirt
can be signs of
places 
long covered over

begin digging
in a grid
of numbered squares

trowels and brushes 
remove topsoil
each strata reveals 
secrets
from a different time

keep digging!
piece together bits
of potsherds
remake bowls and cups
put our past together

a puzzle
with pieces missing

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California
April 9 - Night on the Reef

Saturday, April 10, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 10

Today's poem comes from p. 15, 80-81, 99, and 160 of Astrophysics for Young People in a Hurry, written by Neil deGrasse Tyson with Gregory Mone.

The Greatest Story Ever Told

big bang
gravity working to bring
   everything together
expanding universe working to 
   spread everything out
galaxies
stars
planets 
people
   matter all

big bang
forged one-of-a-kind
elements
unbelievably strange
yet atoms and particles
that make our bodies
are spread across the universe
   making us one
   and the same

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens
April 8 - Muir in California

Friday, April 09, 2021

Poetry Friday and NPM 2021 - Found Poem 9

Welcome Poetry Friday friends! This year for National Poetry Month I'm writing and sharing found poems, most of which are science- or nature-themed. You can learn more about this form and my plans in this post describing the project. I'm also sharing these found poems as images on my Instagram in case you want to see them all in one place. 

Today's poem comes from pages 7, 20, and 48 of Project Seahorse, written by Pamela S. Turner with photographs by Scott Tuason.

Night on the Reef

pony-faced fish
hover and flutter
reach out with
monkey-like tails

beautiful and vulnerable
the only fish
that holds your hand

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series.
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens

I do hope you'll take some time to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Tabatha Yeatts at The Opposite of Indifference. Happy Poetry Friday all!

Thursday, April 08, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 8

Today's poem comes from Chapter 5 of John Muir: America's First Environmentalist, written by Kathryn Lasky and illustrated by Stan Fellows. 

Muir in California

he boarded a ship
for San Francisco
didn't like the city
but did notice
flowers 
on windowsills

pointed in the direction 
of the mountains
he set off
swept up in the thrill
of the wilderness
drawn as if by 
magnetic force

found music in 
everything
water, wind
vibrations of pine needles
crescendos of a thunderstorm

entranced by 
snow and ice
secrets of nature
wild places
he cherished beauty

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series.
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles
April 6 - Mount St. Helens

Wednesday, April 07, 2021

For the Love of Spiders and Spi-ku

I've been a fan of spiders for ages, long before I became a faculty member at the only college in the country with a spider mascot. As a classroom teacher I had a tarantula in my classroom and often shared spider-related humor with my students. A particular favorite was this Calvin and Hobbes strip. 
If you can't quite make out the text, here's what Calvin opines.
Like delicate lace,
so the threads intertwine,
Oh, gossamer web
of wondrous design!
Such beauty and grace
wild nature produces … 
UGHH, look at the spider
suck out that bug’s juices! 

While many folks focus on the "yuck factor," spiders are truly fascinating creatures. Leslie Bulion has fully captured how amazing they are in both verse and prose in Spi-ku: A Clutter of Short Verse on Eight Legs. Add in the incredible illustrations by Robert Meganck and you have a masterpiece that even arachnophobes will love.

Bulion is a master of informational texts that marry engaging, kid-friendly poetry with science. I wish her books had been around 33 years ago when I settled into my first classroom, eager to put science books in kids hands that would neither put them to sleep with their didactic approach to content, nor turn them away with the complexity of the writing. Not only were truly exceptional nonfiction science books hard to find back then, but poetry was almost nonexistent. As someone who encourages teachers to integrate poetry and children's literature into content area instruction, Leslie's books are a gift.

Let's start this review by exploring from the back. My students know how much I love back matter. It's one of the components that I believe separates good nonfiction texts from great ones. The back matter in Spi-ku consists of a glossary of 24 terms, notes on poetics forms, spider identification that includes common and scientific names (genus and species) for the 53 spiders illustrated so carefully by Meganck, ideas for going on a spider hunt, an annotated bibliography with resources for further study, the author's acknowledgements (yes, she consulted with experts!), a double-page spread showing spiders' relative sizes, and a page of close-up illustrations of the spiders that appear on the cover. Phew! See what I mean about back matter? This information adds a welcome layer of depth to the text.

While many of the poems in the text use Japanese or Japanese-inspired forms, such as haiku, tanka, dodoitsu, and cinquain, there are other forms, including limerick, double dactyl, free verse, concrete, and many more. The first poem, "Araneae All Around" provides a nice introduction to the humble spider and the volume. The poems are all accompanied by illustrations of spiders, their silks, and webs. I found myself constantly flipping between the pages and the spider identification in the back to try and determine exactly what spiders I was looking at. After the introductory poem, Bulion introduces arachnids, or the class of invertebrates that spiders belong to.

(Click to enlarge.)

I adore the word play in using mite in this poem. This is the kind of thing that students will remember. I know this one turn of phrase is a great way to remember at least one other type of organism found in the arachnid class. As pictured above, each double-page spread includes one or more verses and a block of informational text. The spiders highlighted in the text blocks appear in boldface to make them stand out. The information unfolds in a thoughtfully organized fashion, taking readers on a journey that has them learning about spider silk, spider movement, how they catch and eat their meals, their webs, how some spiders capture prey without the use of a web or snare, how spiders fool both prey and predators, spider senses, and so much more. 

I learned as much from the poems in the book as I did the nonfiction excerpts. The 3 different spreads on spider enemies all include poems for two voices and are particularly engaging when read aloud. The text ends with a final poem entitled "Appreciate Araneae!" After learning so much about them, it's hard not to appreciate all they contribute to "Our Spiderful World," which just so happens to be the heading for the last block of nonfiction text. (Go ahead, see for yourself!)

(Click to enlarge.)

There is so much to love in this volume. I encourage all you folks who are fearful or disdainful of spiders to be brave and take a peak. I guarantee that by the end of it, even the biggest spider-haters will be converts. 

For all you teachers out there, Leslie has developed a particularly useful Educator's Guide. Don't miss it!

Thanks to PeachTree for sending me a copy of the book and including me on the blog tour. You can check out the other stops this week to learn more.
You can learn more about Leslie Bulion and her books at her web site. You can also find her on social media at:
You can learn more about Robert Meganck and his art on his web site. (Turns out, he's my neighbor here in Virginia. Hi Robert!) You can also find him on social media at:
Finally, keep up with PeachTree Publishing and see what's new in their world of books at:

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 7

Today's poem comes from The Shape of the World: A Portrait of Frank Lloyd Wright, written by K.L. Going and illustrated by Lauren Stringer.

Beautiful Buildings

he would learn
cubes, spheres,
cones, pyramids
cylinders
shapes built up
tall or wide
flat or round

he marveled at
the world
saw shapes
everywhere he looked
loved the shape
of the world

he never forgot
hills and prairies
chose windows
set buildings
one with the world
and the wide expanse
of sky

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series.
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles

Tuesday, April 06, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 6

Today's poem comes from p. 10-11 of Will It Blow? Become a Volcano Detective At Mount St. Helens, written by Elizabeth Rusch and illustrated by K.E. Lewis.

Mount St. Helens (May 18, 1980)

Earthquake!

WHOOSH!
landslide buried miles
under earth and rocks
POP!
"stone wind" blasted
ash, rocks, boulders
BANG!
erupting upward
ash-cloud
circled the globe
HISS!
gas, ash, pumice
rolled down
SPLAT!
heat melted ice
and snow
mud flowed

pristine mountain
transformed into
steaming moonscape

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series.
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles

Monday, April 05, 2021

NPM 2020 - Found Poem 5

Today's found poem comes from p. 6-14 of Girls Who Looked Under Rocks: The Lives of Six Pioneering Naturalists, written by Jeannine Atkins and illustrated by Paula Conner.

Following Butterflies

insects were Maria's favorites
she searched for butterflies
and spiders
brought home caterpillars
moved by
God's attention to
small beings
she painted
extraordinary patterns
nature's beauty
was wide

egg
  caterpillar
    cocoon
      emerging butterfly
metamorphosis
admired

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series.
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem
April 4 - Soap Bubbles

Sunday, April 04, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 4

Today's found poem comes from p. 15 of A Drop of Water, by Walter Wick.

Soap Bubbles

dazzling beauty
delicate precision
nearly perfect 
shimmering liquid

soapy water
stretches
without breaking
shrinks to form 
a sphere

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series.
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind
April 3 - Zentangle Poem

Saturday, April 03, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 3

Today's poem is a zentangle poem. Kat Apel does a really nice job describing them on her site. This is similar to blackout poetry, though doodles and lines are used to block and frame the words.

This poem was made from a page (p. 197) in the story "William the Conqueror," found in Maugham's Choice of Kipling's Best, published by Doubleday & Company in 1953. I found this at a thrift shop, so even though it set my teeth on edge to destroy a used book, I did enjoy creating this poem about things I actually love, save one. Can you guess which one is NOT true?

Here's a closeup of the page.
Found List Poem

I like
   teaching
   beauty
   books and poetry
   big gatherings
   dinners
   throwing a stone
   the desert
   the Himalayan foothills
   evening lights
   the daily paper
   sleep
   telegrams

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. Until then, you may want to read previous poems in this series.
April 1 - Flotsam
April 2 - A Warm Wind

Friday, April 02, 2021

Poetry Friday and NPM 2021 - Found Poem 2

Welcome Poetry Friday friends! This year for National Poetry Month I'm writing and sharing found poems. You can learn more about this form and my plans in this post describing the project.

Today's found poem comes from p. 176-180 of Charlotte's Web Signature Edition, written by E.B. White and illustrated by Garth Williams.

A Warm Wind

winter ended at last
from the pond
in shrill chorus
hundreds of 
little frogs

snows melted, ran away
streams bubbled
with rushing water
sparrow arrived
and sang

light strengthened
mornings came sooner
another new lamb
goose sitting on eggs
sky wider
damp earth
sweet springtime

the moment for
setting forth
is here
go out
into the world
wherever the wind
takes you

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found. You can also read previous poems in this series.
April 1 - Flotsam

In the meantime, be sure to check out all the wonderful poetic things being shared and collected today by Mary Lee at A Year of Reading.

Thursday, April 01, 2021

NPM 2021 - Found Poem 1

Today's found poem comes from p. 26-28 of Tracking Trash: Flotsam, Jetsam, and the Science of Ocean Motion by Loree Griffin Burns.

Flotsam

beachcombers gather
their finds
hints of serendipity
baskets of toys
a gold mine
washed ashore
 a duck
 a frog
managed a
treacherous journey

floating trash
goes on and on

Poem ©Tricia Stohr-Hunt, 2021. All rights reserved.

I hope you'll come back tomorrow and see what new poem I've found.

National Poetry Month Project 2021 - Found Poems

I started writing centos a few weeks ago, thinking this would be the focus of my National Poetry Month Project. I even shared this at the Sunday writing session with my Poetry Sisters. However, after a bit of thought, I decided to expand the project and focus on a variety of found poem types.

At the most basic level, found poems are poems composed from words and phrases found in another text. Here is a more comprehensive description from the folks at Poets.org.

Found poems take existing texts and refashion them, reorder them, and present them as poems. The literary equivalent of a collage, found poetry is often made from newspaper articles, street signs, graffiti, speeches, letters, or even other poems.

A pure found poem consists exclusively of outside texts: the words of the poem remain as they were found, with few additions or omissions. Decisions of form, such as where to break a line, are left to the poet.
And here is what is written on the "About" page at The Found Poetry Review.
“Happy poets who write found poetry go pawing through popular culture like sculptors on trash heaps. They hold and wave aloft usable artifacts and fragments: jingles and ad copy, menus and broadcasts — all objet trouvés, the literary equivalents of Warhol’s Campbell’s soup cans and Duchamp’s bicycle. By entering a found text as a poem, the poet doubles its context. The original meaning remains intact, but now it swings between two poles. The poet adds, or at any rate increases, the element of delight. This is an urban, youthful, ironic, cruising kind of poetry. It serves up whole texts, or interrupted fragments of texts.” — Annie Dillard

Put another way, found poetry is the literary version of a collage. Poets select a source text or texts — anything from traditional texts like books, magazines and newspapers to more nontraditional sources like product packaging, junk mail or court transcripts — then excerpt words and phrases from the text(s) to create a new piece.
What I love about the Found Poetry site is that they describe different types of found poetry and where possible, provide examples. You can learn about erasure, free-form excerpting and remixing, cento, and cut-up. They also provide a quick but very helpful introduction to issues of fair use.

In an NCTE article on found and headline poems I found this most useful and inspiring language for thinking about found poetry.
Plenty of strong and beautiful poems are made from plain language. You sometimes hear such language in conversation, when people are talking their best. Listen. Sometimes you yourself say wonderful things. Admit it. You can find moving, rich language in books, on walls, even in junk mail. (From such sources you’ll probably find better poems, or better beginnings for poems, than from dictionaries and other word books.) 
So, poems hide in things you and others say and write. They lie buried in places where language isn’t so self-conscious as “real poetry” often is.
So found poetry is inspired by every little thing, you just need to keep your eyes, ears, and heart open to the possibilities.
If you would like to try writing found poems yourself or with your students, here are some helpful resources.
Now that you are inspired, go out and find yourself a poem! I'll be sharing my own found poems all month, so please come back and see what I've been working on.

If you are interested in other National Poetry Month happenings, Susan at Soul Blossom Living has an ever growing list of blogs and projects for you to check out. Happy National Poetry Month all!